Color Mixing Video on Youtube

Hey guys! I want to fill you in on my latest video. I was really excited to make it, as it marks my first video in front on the camera. Which was nerve racking, but fun!

In the video I demonstrate how I mix my colors for my beach paintings. I keep it fairly simple, although color theory can get very complex if you haven’t studied it. I use a double primary palette of 2 reds, 2 yellows, and 2 blues along with purple, pink, white and Burnt Sienna.

Here is a complete list of all the colors that I use:

  • Pthalo Blue
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cadmium Yellow Medium
  • Cadmium Yellow Light
  • Cadmium Red Light
  • Alizarin Crimson 
  • Titanium White
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Turquoise Blue
  • Manganese Violet
  • Bright Pink
  • Sap Green
  • Permanent Green Light

 

 

I have always been wildly passionate about color. I am constantly looking at colors everywhere I go. I believe this is an important part of being an artist, because as artists, our colors are our friends.

I hope you enjoy it, and until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

Official Banner

Advertisements

Painting a Rocky Coast: Palette Knife Tutorial

In this tutorial I’ll be showing you how to paint an awesome beach painting with palette knives. I will be doing an exciting rocky coast!

So let’s get started.

The colors I’ll be using are:

Titanium White, Pthalo Blue, Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, Turquoise, Cadmium Yellow Light and Medium.

20170428_141826

To begin, I’ll take a bit of Pthalo Blue and Ultramarine Blue and mix them with Titanium white. This will be our sky color. It will be pretty light with this painting. The masking tape just helps us keep a straight line. This will be where the sea meets the sky. Pretend that you are buttering toast! That is the best way to use palette knives!

 

20170428_142716

This will be our land. To get that atmospheric color, we can add the 2 blues with some Burnt Sienna and white. Remember to keep this relatively cool (blue), as cool colors recede and warm colors move forward. This land is in the distance.

 

20170428_144816

I wanted the land to curve a little toward the viewer, and I also added a light earth color to the hills in the background. Make it look like trees and rocks. We will go back and add more detail later. Let’s just get the canvas completely covered with our underpainting. The ocean color on the top can be achieved by mixing Turquoise with Pthalo blue. For the bottom part of our sea, simply take that same color and mix in a bunch of Ultramarine.

 

20170428_150009

Bring the two blues together like so. The bare part of the canvas left over will be our sand and also some Tussock grass on a hill.

 

20170428_154844

For this sand color, we need to mix several different colors together. The majority of the mixture will be white, but we will need to add in some Burnt Sienna and a speck of Ultramarine. I also added in some detail to the hills in the background by adding pine trees. These won’t be green like we normally see them because they are far away and there is a lot of air in between. So keep the green very gray and dull.

 

20170428_162716

Here we can start blocking in the grassy hill in the foreground with some an Olive green color, mixed from Cadmium Yellow Medium, Burnt Sienna, white, and Ultramarine. Whenever I add in Ultramarine and Burnt Sienna, I am graying down the mixture, as those two colors together create black. I also scraped the paint off of the canvas to add in our rocks. This is the great thing about palette knives. You can scrape paint clean off, although the paint will leave behind a color stain. But that’s A-Okay!

 

20170428_165112

Here I finished out the details for the rocks in the ocean. I added some moss on them and also added some light and shadow, which makes them “pop.” Remember that there will need to be shadows behind them in the water as well. For the hill in the foreground, I added some bright greens and shadows as well to give the illusion of uneven terrain. I also added in some waves in the ocean with some teal. I like to use a thin narrow palette knife for details like that. There are all kinds of different knives you can buy with different shapes and blades.

 

20170428_172659

And here is the finished painting!

I decided to make the big rock a sea arch by scraping out a hole and filling it with our ocean color. And for the waves, you can use white straight from the tube, as these are shining in the sun. Just glob on the white with the tip of the knife to makes the waves. And have fun with this if you decide to give it a whirl.

Palette knives are amazing to work with!!

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Don’t forget to check out my online shop and also my new Youtube video. 

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

 

And until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world. It could always use it!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

Official Banner

 

Painting Clouds with Palette Knives

 

Good morning!

I’m beach artist Ryan Kimba, and today I will be showing you a quick painting lesson.

Before we begin, remember that palette knives were not created for us to paint in a realistic style. With knives we need to surrender total control and paint loose. The clouds in my paintings are impressionistic. They look like clouds but they are by no means life-like. And they don’t need to be.

Let’s start off with a backdrop of blue.

20170304_170515

For the top of the sky we will use Pthalo Blue dulled down with a little bit of Titanium White. Work it from side to side like you are buttering toast. This is exactly how it will feel. To put more butter on your bread, you need to use varying amounts of pressure and tilt the knife downwards and upwards. Same thing when you are painting with a knife!

 

20170304_171117

For the bottom half of our sky we will use Pthalo but with a large amount of Ultramarine blue mixed in. This shade of blue will be much warmer than the top. When side by side, see how the bottom blue leans more toward purple? Generally the sky tends to get more purple and hazy as you go to the horizon.

 

20170304_171957

In this step we are simply blending the two colors together. This is a fairly quick process. And now that we have our base, we can begin adding clouds!

 

20170304_172510

This is where we add straight white out of the tube. Now your initial dab with the white will mix in with the blue beneath, so do not fear. Just add in some thicker white paint to sit on top of the stained white. You can make long wispy clouds or you can make puffy cumulus clouds. It’s totally up to you! Have fun with it!

 

20170304_172819

When I am painting clouds, I like to roll the white paint onto the bottom tip of the knife blade, rubbing it onto the canvas in a rolling motion. An amazing characteristic of palette knives is that they are surprisingly flexible. You can bend them any which way you choose and they will spring right back into action.

 

20170304_173018

And here we have a completed cloudy blue sky. For all of you artists that don’t like to paint clouds—do not be afraid! Give this a try. The only way to learn is by practicing and experimenting. You may even find your own exciting way of painting clouds!

Don’t forget to follow my Etsy shop and browse my original paintings:

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

 

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Youtube channel or leave a comment and let me know what you think of my videos. I’d love to here from you.

 

Until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world.

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

iusb_760x100

 

The 5 Tools *EVERY* Artist Needs

lets-go-sailing

 

What tools does every artist need to have at their disposal? I’ll give you a hint. They can’t be bought at any art store. Let’s get right down to it…

 

1. Vulnerability

This is very important, so I’d like to cover it first. Every artist must be vulnerable at some point in their creative lives. Vulnerability is the key to inspiring others. When we are vulnerable, we put our true selves in front of the world. By sharing our art, we are exposing our inmost ideas, beliefs, hopes, and flaws. Of course, being vulnerable is not the easiest thing to do, but we must do it if we want to build an audience for our art.

Take my new Youtube channel, for instance. It takes a lot of guts and faith for me to put myself out there like that. Now people from all over the world, souls whom I’ve never met, can listen to my voice and watch me paint. It’s a crazy thing opening yourself up to being vulnerable, but there is so much beauty in it. And by seeing your own vulnerability, it allows others to open up and be who they are.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

2. Failure

Why do I dare list failure as an addition to every artist’s tool belt? Simple. Because when you pursue your dream, failure will be a close companion. You are going to fail, a LOT of the time. That’s the bottom line. But it’s not the act of failing that truly matters, it is how we use it. After all, failing can be a incredibly significant resource. It grants us the liberty to learn, grow, stretch, and multiply. 

I’ve personally failed more times than I’ve succeeded. I’ve been rejected from multiple national art contests and magazines. I’ve been mocked and laughed at while selling at art fairs. I even received an email from a lady a few years ago saying that my art was “ugly and boring!” But all of these failures have molded me into the man I am today. Not to mention they have made me a more sensitive and effective artist. So the moral of the story is this—don’t be afraid to fail. It is nothing personal. It simply means you need to approach your goals from a different direction.

View my site here: 

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

3. Persistence

This goes hand in hand with failure, in my honest opinion. Persistence is the ability to go from disappointment to disappointment without losing steam. In other words, persistence is the tool that will help you go on, even when you don’t want to. That may not be Webster’s definition of the word, but it is true nevertheless. I had to be persistent when starting my own business, and you will too. You must keep attacking your objective until it is met.

Here is my question to you; how long should you keep working to achieve your dream? 

The answer is,

as long as it takes.

4. An Open Mind

This tool is often overlooked, but it is so crucial. Not everybody is going to like what you paint, sculpt, knit, photograph, draw, or craft. And that is okay. That is what makes the world special and unique. But no matter what you like to create, know that there is a market out there filled with people who will love what you do. All you have to do is find them. Keeping an open mind will allow you to view your efforts objectively. Not to mention that having an open mind will be invaluable when dealing with criticism. Even if somebody does like you art, they may think about it much differently than you do. And again, that is okay.

And last but certainly not least, we have patience.

5. Patience

The reality is that it takes weeks, months, and years to build a healthy following of loyal supporters. There are hardly any “overnight successes,” and of the few artists that do hit it big in a relatively short amount of time, it usually doesn’t last. The hype will die and the dust will stagnate because their careers were not constructed with time and experience. For in the end, time and experience reign supreme. So if you are an artist that doesn’t like to wait, then don’t. I’m not telling you to sit back and wait. To achieve success you have to take action. But even with consistent action, it still takes time to realize lasting achievement in the art world. So give your dreams time, and they will surely be realized.

Well, I hope you enjoyed my 5 tools. Don’t be afraid to drop a line and tell me what tools you believe are most important. Not only do I want to help other artists and demonstrate my painting techniques with my blog, I also want to hear from you. We artists have to stick together! I believe that with all of my heart.

Don’t forget to check out my latest paintings on my online shop!

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

Until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world.

And as always, do what you love to do.

Ryan Kimba

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html?tab=artwork

 etsy-banner

“Reach for the Sky”–Painting a Commission: Step 2

Working on clouds is always an exciting and challenging ordeal. They are soft and need to be blended quite a bit. But some clouds are bright with harder edges. And the variety of clouds is endless…which makes them so fun to paint. We can do whatever we want with them!

My commission painting is going well so far and we will now begin livening up our sky a bit. If you missed part one of this commission series, here is the link:

https://ryankimba.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/beneath-the-surface-painting-a-commission-step-1/

Here are the colors I will be using for our clouds.

20170118_073201.jpg

For our violet I mixed some Alizarin Crimson, which is a bluer red, with Ultramarine Blue. This color will be dark, so don’t forget to mix in some Titanium White. We will have a few shades of pink also, some warmer and some cooler. The base of my pink colors is Bright Pink from the Old Holland line. Use the palette knives to mix the paints on your palette and use the fan brushes to apply to the support.

 

20170118_073511.jpg

First let’s start with a mid-tone pink color, smudging it in with the palette knife. From there we can scrape these mounds together with the fan brush.

 

20170118_073907.jpg

Here is what our canvas should look like, with some pink at the horizon and also where the two blues intersect. The next part of the process will consist of getting rid of that unsightly border line between the blues.

 

20170118_074731.jpg

In this phase I simply added in some Cadmium Yellow Medium to warm up the bottom of our pink clouds. This is where the sun is setting, so we want a bit of a gold lining. To achieve this let’s mix in a tiny speck of the yellow to white and rub the filbert brush along that dark blue border line. This will literally make our sky shine!

 

20170118_080511.jpg

Now the fun really begins as we add in our lovely violet color to make the darkest clouds, the ones that are closest to the viewer. When painting them, make sure they don’t all look the same. I like to do several types of cloud when I am working on a sky in oils. It adds interest, especially when our focal point is the actual sky itself. For painting these clouds I like to use a soft-haired filbert brush, a #2, to be precise. But that is just my own personal preference. You can use any brush you’d like.

 

20170118_083555.jpg

We will wrap up the sky by adding in some of the finer details to make the sky look polished. The key here is to blur the edges of the clouds to make them look puffy. I must say this commissioned painting is looking nice so far! I hope you are enjoying watching the process unfold as well.

Stay tuned next week for the last part of our series, in which we will be working on the tree tops at the bottom of our sky.

Commissions are great for any artist. They really allow you to stretch yourself mentally and artistically, being able to create something beautiful from another person’s life. Not to mention the nice payday that commission work can bring.

As always, do what you love to do. There is no finer calling. I wish you all the best in your lives and your creative endeavors, whatever they may be.

I’ll see you for part 3!

Until next time,

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

etsy-banner

 

 

“Beneath the Surface”–Painting a Commission: Step 1

Over the next several blogs I will be demonstrating the process of painting with oils. So if you haven’t already, be sure to follow my blog to stay updated on the series.

I recently obtained a commission assignment of a beautiful winter sunset with some dark trees at the bottom of the scene. So that is what we will be doing here. In this post we will create an underpainting in which we will build our subsequent layers over. One of the main reasons to do this is because when you are painting with oils, the “fat over lean” rule applies. This means that you want to start with thin paint and go thicker with each new layer, so that your painting doesn’t crack over time!

Step 1: Creating an underpainting

First, let’s talk about what materials we will be using.

20170114_222912

To thin down the paint, we will use Liquin Fine Detail Medium made by Windsor & Newton. This will make the paint spread easier and will also save paint by increasing your paint flow from your brush. Although I am a palette knife artist, I will also be using some fan brushes as well, upon client request.

For our oil paints, I use a combination of Old Holland and Williamsburg. But you can use any brand you desire, so long as it is professional grade.

For this first step in our commission painting, we will use the following colors:

1.Titanium white

2. Pthalo Blue

3. Cadmium Yellow Light

4. Ultramarine Blue (mix with Burn Sienna to make black)

5. Burnt Sienna

 

20170114_223508.jpg

Let’s begin by dipping our fan brush into the Liquin and then rolling the tip of it into the paint. To achieve this shade of blue simply mix a bit of Pthalo Blue and your black into a puddle of Titanium White. We will use this color for the top 2/3 of the canvas. If your paint starts to get a little thick and won’t spread quickly, just add in some more Liquin. 

Next we will lighten this color with a lot more of the white and mix in a tiny dab of yellow to make the blue warmer. This will give the bottom of our sky more of a “setting sun effect.” Block in the rest of the sky with this color. 

20170114_225347.jpg

And there you have it! A nice underpainting for our commissioned sunset in only a few minutes. Keep in mind that this will need to completely dry before we begin adding our clouds. This will take a couple of days; three at the most. 

I will see you here next week for part 2!

Don’t forget to check out my beach paintings on my online shop:

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

 

Also, for those of you that don’t know, I am now on Youtube! Take a gander at my channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

 

I hope you all are having a wonderful new year so far!

Until next time, let’s bring some color into the world.

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba

etsy-banner