“How do I know what art to buy?”

On my blog and Youtube channel I have stated how important it is to help other artists. To encourage them and inspire them to get their own art out in the world.

I firmly believe in this, but I wanted to put my money where my mouth is. So I have recently taken up buying art from local artists at art fairs. Starting my own art collection for my studio has been so exciting and rewarding, not to mention it helps out other artists’ sales. It feels so great to add joy to my own life through other art that I love.

There Goes the Sun.jpgHere is a new painting entitled, “There Goes the sun.” You can check it out in my shop!

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

Of course, most of the pieces I have bought are ocean themed, but hey, that’s what I respond to.

And here is what I learned so far when it comes to purchasing original artwork or reproductions.

Buy from your gut! Yes! That is the ultimate tip. Don’t buy according to what is trending or what you may feel pressured to get. Buy the piece that grabs you the most.

Maybe it brings a tear to your eye?

Maybe it excites you or touches the pathos in your soul?

Maybe it fills you with joy?

These are reasons to buy art, because the truth is, you are going to be living with the artwork for many years to come. So why buy something that you don’t like? It should stop you in your tracks whenever you pass it by in your home.

Here is a piece I recently bought from marine artist Jen Callahan, who I am a HUGE fan of. I’m so glad I finally got to meet her in person at the Art in the Park in Plymouth, Michigan.

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I couldn’t quite swing the original she had just finished called “Turtle Tag” (although I really wanted it!), but I am now the proud new owner of the very first in the Limited Edition Print. And how did I come to pick this one? Well, because it tugged at my heart and I fell in love with the incredible array off soft colors. It is soothing, exciting, and whimsical.

So the moral of the story—only buy art that you MUST have! As long as you do that you can’t go wrong. Not to mention you won’t ever have to feel buyer’s remorse.

And don’t forget to check out the latest Ryan Kimba Youtube video! You can watch it below. And don’t forget to subscribe for future beach painting videos.

 

Until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world.

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

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How do I become a BETTER artist???

From time to time other people will ask me, “how do I become a better artist?” It’s usually a lack of confidence that drives them to ask that question. I always get a kick out of this when I hear it.

How do you become a better artist?

The answer is, become a better person.

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It’s a very disappointing and frustrating experience in life to try to be better at something without becoming a better person. Why? Because in order to do, you must first be. I believe that a lot of artists have this one backwards. They think that being a successful artist will make them a better person.

But unfortunately it doesn’t work this way.

Okay, okay Ryan! I get it! But what do you mean when you say “better person?” I’m glad that you asked. I’m saying that you need to become more disciplined. You have to paint a LOT! You have to work at it every day for a long period of time. You have to develop yourself into a consummate professional.

Only by becoming smarter, more loving, positive, passionate, and determined will you find success in anything in life. Art is no different. But where art is different is that it is an extension of your inner world and imagination.

The biggest part of this is discovering your artistic voice, or “style” as it is often called in the art world. Finding your voice is what helps the audience relate to what you do. It becomes your brand. It becomes what you are known by. Go to my Etsy shop and look at my body of paintings.

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

They all look like they were painted by the same artist. They all have my characteristic ‘Ryan Kimba’ signature to them. This is what you need to find, and it only comes from creating a large amount of work. Forcing yourself to paint forces you to rip yourself open and let the contents fall to the floor. Only then can you put them together.

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The artist that is willing to work very hard on themselves and their craft is the one that will invariably attain success, respect, and admiration.

But remember, it must first start with you.

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I hope everyone enjoyed America’s birthday, and until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world with some awesome art. Let’s become better artists.

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

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Realism—- VS —-Impressionism!

The hardest part about going away from realistic art was being okay with the fact that I didn’t have to paint realistically. The truth is, I got burned out on painting in that style. Having to paint too tight started to get old after so many years as I realistic artist.

I wanted to express myself. I wanted to be loose and free in my planning and approach. And I wanted my brush strokes to be more spontaneous and random. In other words, I wanted to paint in a impressionistic form.

And to do that, I knew I needed to make a change.

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And in order to truly make a change, I needed to do something different. And what was that, you ask?

I put away my brushes and picked up a palette knife.

http://www.etsy.com/RKBeachPaintings

Starting to use palette knives forced me to paint loose. I had no choice. Knives don’t allow for super fine detail and life-like strokes. They were invented to resist all of that. And now that I use only palette knives in my work, I don’t see myself ever going back to brushes.

I feel that too many times “realism” in art is the stamp of approval for the artist. People in general seem to enjoy looking at realistic art. If it looks real, they view the artist as better or more talented

They see the art for what it is.

They can understand it; they can relate to it.

But this doesn’t mean that realism is better. It is only one style or genre of painting. There are many others to choose from. Once I became alright with change, I grew exponentially as an artist. And because my impressionist style doesn’t take as long, I can paint many more pieces than I could have before.

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So the moral of the story—do what you feel in your heart, not what you think you have to do. If you put love and passion into your work, you will eventually find an audience who loves and is passionate about it too.

Hope you had a nice Easter.

And until next time,

let’s keep bringing some more color into the world!

-Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

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Painting your Favorite Animal

Glad to be back from the Bahamas! It was a wonderful trip I’ll never forget. I got to swim with a dolphin named Cortes, jet-ski on the ocean, and visit some tranquil, stunning islands! The palm tree-lined beaches were incredible, and the water was almost surreal.

Never in my life have I seen such a piercing turquoise blue color.

So I used to paint a lot of animals back when I was using pastels, but I decided to get back to painting them. Since I am a beach artist, I can paint marine animals that will really accent my beach scenes. With the ocean, the marine life possibilities are endless. I can do coral reefs, dolphins, crabs, sea turtles, sea birds, sea shells, starfish, and on and on. 

I recently painted a portrait of my favorite animal, the Wandering albatross. It was so exciting to paint one soaring over a wave. The albatross is one of the most hardy creatures on the planet, spending all of it’s life on the wing, facing the fiercest storms mother nature can deliver. They only touch down on land to breed or find a mate. They are simply the masters of the open ocean.

The Great Wanderer.jpgThe Great Wanderer  Oils on canvas  11×14 inches

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

We can learn a lot from these beautiful birds. They are a shining example of strength, persistence, and perseverance! And it was an honor to paint one in my palette knife style.

Don’t forget to subscribe to my Youtube channel. I try to post 1 or 2 new videos a month. It has been a process, for sure. But I am learning so much and growing with each new video! Which is all that matters!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

I hope that you had an inspiring week of growth and creativity. And if you haven’t tried painting your favorite animal yet, give it a shot. It is a very rewarding experience.

Until next time, let’s bring some color into the world!

-Ryan Kimba

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html

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The Colors of a Beach Painting

The colors artists use are extremely different from one another. And that is okay. There is nothing wrong with picking your own unique palette of beautiful colors. Your colors say a lot about your style and the type of artist you are. 

Whenever another artist tells you that you need to use different colors, or ones that they love, don’t put too much stock in it. When someone tells you “you ought to use this blue or that red,” you have to resist all of that. Just because something works for someone else, it doesn’t mean that it will work for you. Or that you will even like it.

Always follow your gut, and listen to your heart. Picking your color palette is one of the most crucial things an oil painter can do.

Now if you don’t have a ton of experience painting, then by all means take notes from your peers and see what they are using. I’d like to share with you some of the staples on my own palette, especially when painting sunsets. All of these colors I have pretty much stumbled upon. By happy accident, of course! So here they are.

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Titanium White

I could not work without this amazing color. White is actually my favorite color, although it is technically all of the colors in the spectrum, or the absence of color (like most people say). I use TW to tint all of my colors on my palette. I also use it to paint bright white clouds and waves under a bright sun. There are other good whites, but nothing is stronger and more pigment-rich than this one.

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Pthalo Blue

This cool blue is incredibly strong. The pigment Phthalocyanine has a dramatic tinting strength, which you will need to look out for in your mixtures. Mixing Pthalo into another will overwhelm the other color quickly, so use small dabs of it. It’s powerful tinting capacity aside, this is a gorgeous true blue that is priceless when painting the sea and deep blue skies.

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Ultramarine Blue

I have a warm and a cool blue on my palette. This is the warm blue, meaning it leans more towards red on the color wheel. Ultramarine Blue has a slightly purplish undertone to it, which makes it invaluable for painting the shadows in cloud formations and wet sand impressions. I use a TON of it mostly because by mixing this color with Burnt Sienna, I get a brilliant chromatic black, which is a lovely rich black that won’t kill your other colors when mixing.

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Burnt Sienna

Burnt Sienna is a warm reddish brown color that is the other half of my black! It is a terrific color I found after I became tired of mixing this from blue, red, yellow, and black. I wanted something quicker and easier. This color is nice for the trunks of my palm trees, grass, rocks, and for warming cooler colors.

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Manganese Violet

This is a beautiful shade of violet made by the Old Holland line of oils. It is rich, deep, and bright out of the tube, and it cannot be mixed from other colors. This is a fabulous sunset color in your velvety skies. It is also great for flowers. I use this one sparingly.

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Brilliant Pink

Also by Old Holland, I am using this one more and more. It is lush, bright, and tropical. I love to use this for mixing various tints and shades for the tropical flowers which dot a lot of my paintings. You can get a shade similar to this one from mixing white with Cadmium Red, but it will not be as brilliant and true. 

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Carmine Red

Carmine Red is similar to Cadmium Red Medium and other popular pigments. It also makes great magentas, pinks, and browns. It is bold and also has a high tinting strength, so a little goes a long way. CR is a deep blood-red shade that is sure to liven up your sunsets.

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Cadmium Yellow Medium

And lastly we have Cadmium Yellow Medium, which leans towards orange when compared to the “light” of the same name. All of the cadmium colors have high pigment concentrations, which makes them more expensive. They are also fairly toxic, so make sure you have proper ventilation in your studio. This is great for grass, trees, sunlight and bursts of color through the clouds. Mix it with Cadmium Red to get orange, and Pthalo Blue to get a true green.

My new sunset painting below was created using all of these wonderful colors. 

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Don’t forget to check out my art painting tutorial channel on Youtube, and also my Etsy shop.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

I am working on growing my audience and could use your help! So if you haven’t done so yet, be sure to follow my shop and this blog. Also be sure to hit “like” and subscribe to my channel on Youtube.

Thanks for reading, and I hope this has inspired you to bring your own colors into the world. 

Give it a bit of beauty. 

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

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Finding your Artistic *Voice*

What exactly constitutes an artist’s voice? Well, it is a number of intangibles working together. And how exactly do you find your voice, or style as it is often described?

In my opinion, it takes several years of consistently painting to find your voice. You have to put in the time and discipline it takes for your work to truly blossom. It is often about failure, self-discovery, and making mistakes. An art school cannot teach their students about finding their voice.

It must come from within.

To make it as a professional artist, your work must have unity, character, cohesion, and consistency. Your entire body of work should look similar. It has to be distinctive, or else you are going to look like everyone else. Think about it–how many people can point out a Picasso or a Monet? Most people can, and it is because their style is instantly recognizable. Sure, they had tons of copiers and followers, but they managed to eke out a unique voice from how they viewed the world and themselves.

My point is, all of this takes time. It is not something you are born with. Your voice is something that needs to be developed.

Here are 3 older paintings from back when I was painting in a realistic style with brushes.

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My older work may have shared the same theme, seascapes, but they fail to share the same unity. They look like they were created by 3 different artists altogether. One almost has a Albert Bierstadt-esque feel to it, while one sort of looks like a Bob Ross (top left). The one at the bottom looks a little more polished but different nonetheless. These 3 seem to lack the shared elements that constitutes a singular body of work.

Let’s take a look at my new work.

 

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These 3 paintings are clearly done by the same artist. They all share similar feelings, warmth, tone, and expression. This is all part of branding. Whether we are talking about my starfish logo, the textured mounds of paint, or my bold, lively colors—these works of art come together in perfect harmony.

And they all represent how I view the beach and the sea!

I hope you have a better understanding of the ambiguous term “voice.” And I am confident that through experimentation and practice you will discover your own amazing voice! Something that sets you apart from the rest of the world. That is what I wish for you.

Don’t forget to check out my new Youtube video if you haven’t yet given it a gander. If you are enjoying these, hit “like” and subscribe for future speed painting videos.

 

Hope all of you have a wonderful weekend!

And until next time, let’s bring some color into the world.

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

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Taking a Shower in Style!

Fine Art America is an awesome print-on-demand site that enables artists to have their images put on prints, posters, and every day household products. So for an artist such as myself, it is a lovely prospect.

You can now select to get my art on phone cases, coffee mugs, pens, throw pillows, and shower curtains. That’s right…you can get a handy dandy shower curtain! I’m actually going to purchase a shower curtain for my own home. My current one is getting pretty grimy!

But hey, we’ve all been there. Haven’t we?

Here is my link for you to peruse at your leisure:

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html?tab=artwork

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I’ve been busy all this weekend so far plugging away in the studio and creating some new work. I’ve also just posted a brand new video on my Youtube channel. Subscribe and throw a like if you haven’t yet had the chance. With your help I can continue to build up my audience and brand.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

I sincerely hope that you are all having a fantastic weekend with your own art and projects! Let your love for what you do shine through. For me, it’s painting the beach.

So until next time, let’s continue to bring some color into the world. Liven it up a bit!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

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