Taking a Shower in Style!

Fine Art America is an awesome print-on-demand site that enables artists to have their images put on prints, posters, and every day household products. So for an artist such as myself, it is a lovely prospect.

You can now select to get my art on phone cases, coffee mugs, pens, throw pillows, and shower curtains. That’s right…you can get a handy dandy shower curtain! I’m actually going to purchase a shower curtain for my own home. My current one is getting pretty grimy!

But hey, we’ve all been there. Haven’t we?

Here is my link for you to peruse at your leisure:

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html?tab=artwork

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I’ve been busy all this weekend so far plugging away in the studio and creating some new work. I’ve also just posted a brand new video on my Youtube channel. Subscribe and throw a like if you haven’t yet had the chance. With your help I can continue to build up my audience and brand.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

I sincerely hope that you are all having a fantastic weekend with your own art and projects! Let your love for what you do shine through. For me, it’s painting the beach.

So until next time, let’s continue to bring some color into the world. Liven it up a bit!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

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Making Waves…with a Palette Knife!

I feel a tremendous affection for the sea. This is apparent in my artwork. But then, most people feel an affinity to the marine world. With oil painting, however, it is the perfect outlet to show the world the joy I feel for the beach. Words only go so far.

My goal for every beach painting is to make the sea shine; to give it personality and character. To breathe a colorful life into it.

In my heart, my paintings are my paradise.

1Where the Waves Crash.  Oil painting on canvas : 16×20 inches

They grant me the liberty to escape to a brighter place, a more peaceful place. Such is the power of art. It can evoke many different feelings and have extraordinary power.

By using solely palette knives, I have managed to forge a highly unique style for myself. One of rich color, 3D-like textures, and simple beauty. Simple is the best way to describe my style.

It is an honor to be a artistic spokesman for the sea.

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I recently posted my second video on Youtube. Check it out below and show some love by liking and subscribing for future videos.

I enjoy bringing color into the world with each new beach painting! I hope you feel the same about your own talent. The world needs a little more color in it, I like to say. So until next time, follow your passion. It will lead you straight into your purpose.

Here’s to a glorious day,

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

http://etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

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The 5 Tools *EVERY* Artist Needs

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What tools does every artist need to have at their disposal? I’ll give you a hint. They can’t be bought at any art store. Let’s get right down to it…

 

1. Vulnerability

This is very important, so I’d like to cover it first. Every artist must be vulnerable at some point in their creative lives. Vulnerability is the key to inspiring others. When we are vulnerable, we put our true selves in front of the world. By sharing our art, we are exposing our inmost ideas, beliefs, hopes, and flaws. Of course, being vulnerable is not the easiest thing to do, but we must do it if we want to build an audience for our art.

Take my new Youtube channel, for instance. It takes a lot of guts and faith for me to put myself out there like that. Now people from all over the world, souls whom I’ve never met, can listen to my voice and watch me paint. It’s a crazy thing opening yourself up to being vulnerable, but there is so much beauty in it. And by seeing your own vulnerability, it allows others to open up and be who they are.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

2. Failure

Why do I dare list failure as an addition to every artist’s tool belt? Simple. Because when you pursue your dream, failure will be a close companion. You are going to fail, a LOT of the time. That’s the bottom line. But it’s not the act of failing that truly matters, it is how we use it. After all, failing can be a incredibly significant resource. It grants us the liberty to learn, grow, stretch, and multiply. 

I’ve personally failed more times than I’ve succeeded. I’ve been rejected from multiple national art contests and magazines. I’ve been mocked and laughed at while selling at art fairs. I even received an email from a lady a few years ago saying that my art was “ugly and boring!” But all of these failures have molded me into the man I am today. Not to mention they have made me a more sensitive and effective artist. So the moral of the story is this—don’t be afraid to fail. It is nothing personal. It simply means you need to approach your goals from a different direction.

View my site here: 

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

3. Persistence

This goes hand in hand with failure, in my honest opinion. Persistence is the ability to go from disappointment to disappointment without losing steam. In other words, persistence is the tool that will help you go on, even when you don’t want to. That may not be Webster’s definition of the word, but it is true nevertheless. I had to be persistent when starting my own business, and you will too. You must keep attacking your objective until it is met.

Here is my question to you; how long should you keep working to achieve your dream? 

The answer is,

as long as it takes.

4. An Open Mind

This tool is often overlooked, but it is so crucial. Not everybody is going to like what you paint, sculpt, knit, photograph, draw, or craft. And that is okay. That is what makes the world special and unique. But no matter what you like to create, know that there is a market out there filled with people who will love what you do. All you have to do is find them. Keeping an open mind will allow you to view your efforts objectively. Not to mention that having an open mind will be invaluable when dealing with criticism. Even if somebody does like you art, they may think about it much differently than you do. And again, that is okay.

And last but certainly not least, we have patience.

5. Patience

The reality is that it takes weeks, months, and years to build a healthy following of loyal supporters. There are hardly any “overnight successes,” and of the few artists that do hit it big in a relatively short amount of time, it usually doesn’t last. The hype will die and the dust will stagnate because their careers were not constructed with time and experience. For in the end, time and experience reign supreme. So if you are an artist that doesn’t like to wait, then don’t. I’m not telling you to sit back and wait. To achieve success you have to take action. But even with consistent action, it still takes time to realize lasting achievement in the art world. So give your dreams time, and they will surely be realized.

Well, I hope you enjoyed my 5 tools. Don’t be afraid to drop a line and tell me what tools you believe are most important. Not only do I want to help other artists and demonstrate my painting techniques with my blog, I also want to hear from you. We artists have to stick together! I believe that with all of my heart.

Don’t forget to check out my latest paintings on my online shop!

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

Until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world.

And as always, do what you love to do.

Ryan Kimba

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html?tab=artwork

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“Reach for the Sky”–Painting a Commission: Step 2

Working on clouds is always an exciting and challenging ordeal. They are soft and need to be blended quite a bit. But some clouds are bright with harder edges. And the variety of clouds is endless…which makes them so fun to paint. We can do whatever we want with them!

My commission painting is going well so far and we will now begin livening up our sky a bit. If you missed part one of this commission series, here is the link:

https://ryankimba.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/beneath-the-surface-painting-a-commission-step-1/

Here are the colors I will be using for our clouds.

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For our violet I mixed some Alizarin Crimson, which is a bluer red, with Ultramarine Blue. This color will be dark, so don’t forget to mix in some Titanium White. We will have a few shades of pink also, some warmer and some cooler. The base of my pink colors is Bright Pink from the Old Holland line. Use the palette knives to mix the paints on your palette and use the fan brushes to apply to the support.

 

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First let’s start with a mid-tone pink color, smudging it in with the palette knife. From there we can scrape these mounds together with the fan brush.

 

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Here is what our canvas should look like, with some pink at the horizon and also where the two blues intersect. The next part of the process will consist of getting rid of that unsightly border line between the blues.

 

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In this phase I simply added in some Cadmium Yellow Medium to warm up the bottom of our pink clouds. This is where the sun is setting, so we want a bit of a gold lining. To achieve this let’s mix in a tiny speck of the yellow to white and rub the filbert brush along that dark blue border line. This will literally make our sky shine!

 

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Now the fun really begins as we add in our lovely violet color to make the darkest clouds, the ones that are closest to the viewer. When painting them, make sure they don’t all look the same. I like to do several types of cloud when I am working on a sky in oils. It adds interest, especially when our focal point is the actual sky itself. For painting these clouds I like to use a soft-haired filbert brush, a #2, to be precise. But that is just my own personal preference. You can use any brush you’d like.

 

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We will wrap up the sky by adding in some of the finer details to make the sky look polished. The key here is to blur the edges of the clouds to make them look puffy. I must say this commissioned painting is looking nice so far! I hope you are enjoying watching the process unfold as well.

Stay tuned next week for the last part of our series, in which we will be working on the tree tops at the bottom of our sky.

Commissions are great for any artist. They really allow you to stretch yourself mentally and artistically, being able to create something beautiful from another person’s life. Not to mention the nice payday that commission work can bring.

As always, do what you love to do. There is no finer calling. I wish you all the best in your lives and your creative endeavors, whatever they may be.

I’ll see you for part 3!

Until next time,

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

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Let’s Make ’17 a Sure Thing!

Long before I was a palette knife painter of tropical beaches, I was quite the avid drawer. I drew all day every day. But not so much anymore. As I replaced my graphite pencils with painting mediums, I took to the sky and haven’t looked back. I just love working with color and wet paints. Which definitely isn’t a bad thing. It just means you have evolved as an artist.

And in light of the holiday season and the New Year, I thought I’d share with you some of my old drawings, dating back to when I was a teenager. I was going through them the other day on the old computer.

Who doesn’t love a good snowman, right?

solace-in-the-snow

frozen-friends

As the new year approaches, it is a new chance to re-invent ourselves. And I don’t mean in a cliche, cheesy “New Year’s resolution” kind of a way. I’m talking about personal growth. That is what a new year is all about. Getting smarter, better, stronger, and more successful than you were the year before. Becoming a more loving person.

And for us artists, it is another 365 to get our art out into the world and use it to spread joy; to touch other’s souls. Art is such an incredible thing!

If you haven’t had the chance to check out my official website, you can view it here: http://www.ryankimbaart.com

2017 will be special for me because I am starting my own art tutorial channel on Youtube! This will give me the chance to truly shine and show the world how I do what I do.

I wish you all love, peace, hope, and wisdom over the next coming year. I hope it is everything you want it to be.

 

And until next time,

Let’s bring some color into the world!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKSeascapePaintings

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html?tab=artwork

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Which Blue is Better?

Anybody who glances at my body of work will notice all of the blue! I’ve always preferred cooler colors like purple and blue over warm ones like red and yellow. Blue is a staple in my beach paintings. It’s true that I can get a wonderful array of shades from just two main colors: Pthalo Blue and Ultramarine. These colors are truly indispensable on my palette. 

Let’s look at them for a second, shall we?

Ultramarine and Pthalo Blue

Now Ultramarine has a pretty good tinting strength, not to mention a beautiful luster under your studio lights! It is a warm blue, which means it leans more toward purple. It is wonderful for painting warmer skies and mixing with various reds to achieve striking violets. Ultramarine is also good for painting the shadows on clouds. When mixed with some Cadmium Yellow light, you will get a warm Sap Green, albeit one that is a little duller than if you mixed the yellow with Pthalo.

Pthalo Blue is probably my favorite color to work with! But new users beware–it has an extremely dangerous tinting strength. One speck will turn a puddle of white into a strong blue! So make sure you don’t use too much of it when mixing with other colors. On its own, however, it is brilliant to behold. Pthalo Blue is perfect for any ocean color you could want, for bright blue skies, and for mixing awesome greens that lean towards yellow. This is because the color leans more towards yellow already.

So which color is better? Well, that depends on the artist using it. My answer is neither one is better, because they are both EXCELLENT!

If you are a landscape or seascape artist, gives these blues a try. You will not be disappointed. In my opinion, these are the two most essential blues available on the market.


 

Here are some new 3-D beach paintings I’ve been working up in the studio. The top painting has more Ultramarine while the bottom one has more Pthalo Blue. To view them on my artist shop, visit https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

 

 

secret-falls

over-turquoise-waters

What is your favorite color to paint with? I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time, let’s bring some color into the world!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba

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Youtube Bound!

As some of you know, I’m in the process of starting my own art tutorial channel on Youtube. I’m excited about it because not only will it be fun-filled art instruction, it will also be part self-development as well.

I’m a HUGE student of personal development!

I know that as long as I am reading, growing, stretching, and learning–I am happy and alive. And with my own art channel, I hope to inspire others in the same way. My main goal is to help other artists, whether it be with their businesses, their problems and challenges, or simply encouraging them to pick up a paintbrush for the very first time. The possibilities are endless.

I’m hoping to have my first video up by the end of December. There are still a lot of fires to put out, to say the least. For instance, I have very little video editing experience. So to gain some I have been reading a bunch of articles and asking professionals for assistance. I even hired a guy to write me my own theme song!

Needless to say, I’m sure that it will be a very interesting start to this particular journey.

I love to show you guys new work with every post, and this one will be no exception. Here is one of the four paintings I finished over Thanksgiving break, entitled “Call of the Dunes.” You can nearly smell the fresh paint!

call-of-the-dunesCall of the Dunes. Oils on canvas  11×14 inches

Palette knives are so incredible to paint with and I can’t wait to show folks all of the little tricks of the trade. If you enjoyed this post, be sure to like and follow my blog for future art posts.

Looking forward to what’s next,

Ryan Kimba

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

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