Painting a Rocky Coast: Palette Knife Tutorial

In this tutorial I’ll be showing you how to paint an awesome beach painting with palette knives. I will be doing an exciting rocky coast!

So let’s get started.

The colors I’ll be using are:

Titanium White, Pthalo Blue, Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, Turquoise, Cadmium Yellow Light and Medium.

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To begin, I’ll take a bit of Pthalo Blue and Ultramarine Blue and mix them with Titanium white. This will be our sky color. It will be pretty light with this painting. The masking tape just helps us keep a straight line. This will be where the sea meets the sky. Pretend that you are buttering toast! That is the best way to use palette knives!

 

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This will be our land. To get that atmospheric color, we can add the 2 blues with some Burnt Sienna and white. Remember to keep this relatively cool (blue), as cool colors recede and warm colors move forward. This land is in the distance.

 

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I wanted the land to curve a little toward the viewer, and I also added a light earth color to the hills in the background. Make it look like trees and rocks. We will go back and add more detail later. Let’s just get the canvas completely covered with our underpainting. The ocean color on the top can be achieved by mixing Turquoise with Pthalo blue. For the bottom part of our sea, simply take that same color and mix in a bunch of Ultramarine.

 

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Bring the two blues together like so. The bare part of the canvas left over will be our sand and also some Tussock grass on a hill.

 

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For this sand color, we need to mix several different colors together. The majority of the mixture will be white, but we will need to add in some Burnt Sienna and a speck of Ultramarine. I also added in some detail to the hills in the background by adding pine trees. These won’t be green like we normally see them because they are far away and there is a lot of air in between. So keep the green very gray and dull.

 

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Here we can start blocking in the grassy hill in the foreground with some an Olive green color, mixed from Cadmium Yellow Medium, Burnt Sienna, white, and Ultramarine. Whenever I add in Ultramarine and Burnt Sienna, I am graying down the mixture, as those two colors together create black. I also scraped the paint off of the canvas to add in our rocks. This is the great thing about palette knives. You can scrape paint clean off, although the paint will leave behind a color stain. But that’s A-Okay!

 

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Here I finished out the details for the rocks in the ocean. I added some moss on them and also added some light and shadow, which makes them “pop.” Remember that there will need to be shadows behind them in the water as well. For the hill in the foreground, I added some bright greens and shadows as well to give the illusion of uneven terrain. I also added in some waves in the ocean with some teal. I like to use a thin narrow palette knife for details like that. There are all kinds of different knives you can buy with different shapes and blades.

 

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And here is the finished painting!

I decided to make the big rock a sea arch by scraping out a hole and filling it with our ocean color. And for the waves, you can use white straight from the tube, as these are shining in the sun. Just glob on the white with the tip of the knife to makes the waves. And have fun with this if you decide to give it a whirl.

Palette knives are amazing to work with!!

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Don’t forget to check out my online shop and also my new Youtube video. 

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings

 

And until next time,

let’s bring some color into the world. It could always use it!

Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

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Realism—- VS —-Impressionism!

The hardest part about going away from realistic art was being okay with the fact that I didn’t have to paint realistically. The truth is, I got burned out on painting in that style. Having to paint too tight started to get old after so many years as I realistic artist.

I wanted to express myself. I wanted to be loose and free in my planning and approach. And I wanted my brush strokes to be more spontaneous and random. In other words, I wanted to paint in a impressionistic form.

And to do that, I knew I needed to make a change.

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And in order to truly make a change, I needed to do something different. And what was that, you ask?

I put away my brushes and picked up a palette knife.

http://www.etsy.com/RKBeachPaintings

Starting to use palette knives forced me to paint loose. I had no choice. Knives don’t allow for super fine detail and life-like strokes. They were invented to resist all of that. And now that I use only palette knives in my work, I don’t see myself ever going back to brushes.

I feel that too many times “realism” in art is the stamp of approval for the artist. People in general seem to enjoy looking at realistic art. If it looks real, they view the artist as better or more talented

They see the art for what it is.

They can understand it; they can relate to it.

But this doesn’t mean that realism is better. It is only one style or genre of painting. There are many others to choose from. Once I became alright with change, I grew exponentially as an artist. And because my impressionist style doesn’t take as long, I can paint many more pieces than I could have before.

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So the moral of the story—do what you feel in your heart, not what you think you have to do. If you put love and passion into your work, you will eventually find an audience who loves and is passionate about it too.

Hope you had a nice Easter.

And until next time,

let’s keep bringing some more color into the world!

-Ryan Kimba

http://www.ryankimbaart.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

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Painting your Favorite Animal

Glad to be back from the Bahamas! It was a wonderful trip I’ll never forget. I got to swim with a dolphin named Cortes, jet-ski on the ocean, and visit some tranquil, stunning islands! The palm tree-lined beaches were incredible, and the water was almost surreal.

Never in my life have I seen such a piercing turquoise blue color.

So I used to paint a lot of animals back when I was using pastels, but I decided to get back to painting them. Since I am a beach artist, I can paint marine animals that will really accent my beach scenes. With the ocean, the marine life possibilities are endless. I can do coral reefs, dolphins, crabs, sea turtles, sea birds, sea shells, starfish, and on and on. 

I recently painted a portrait of my favorite animal, the Wandering albatross. It was so exciting to paint one soaring over a wave. The albatross is one of the most hardy creatures on the planet, spending all of it’s life on the wing, facing the fiercest storms mother nature can deliver. They only touch down on land to breed or find a mate. They are simply the masters of the open ocean.

The Great Wanderer.jpgThe Great Wanderer  Oils on canvas  11×14 inches

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKBeachPaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

We can learn a lot from these beautiful birds. They are a shining example of strength, persistence, and perseverance! And it was an honor to paint one in my palette knife style.

Don’t forget to subscribe to my Youtube channel. I try to post 1 or 2 new videos a month. It has been a process, for sure. But I am learning so much and growing with each new video! Which is all that matters!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoDaJL5tkFEHCzrC_yYrmcA

I hope that you had an inspiring week of growth and creativity. And if you haven’t tried painting your favorite animal yet, give it a shot. It is a very rewarding experience.

Until next time, let’s bring some color into the world!

-Ryan Kimba

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html

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