A sneak-peek at my color palette!

An artist’s palette is like their fingerprint. No two are the same! The colors we use are mostly for convenience and style, although the process is also deeply personal. Because truth be told, we all see the world through our own lens. And biologists have proven that everyone sees colors differently and responds to them in varied ways.

I stumbled upon my group of colors in a strange way. To quote the great Bob Ross, it was a very “happy accident.” I did a TON of studying on color theory (which is a science) before I started oil painting and found that a DOUBLE PRIMARY palette is the way to go. What this means is that I use two yellows, two reds, and two blues. A “warm” and “cool” version of each. I’ve found that¬†these 6 colors can mix anything you need to get, within reason of course. Some colors such as Viridian and Cerulean Blue cannot be mixed with these, as their hues are uniquely rich in pigment. But rest assured, you can mix pretty much ANYTHING else!

So without further ado….here is my palette…

 

 

Artist Palette

Now we can see the warm and cool primaries along with a couple others I’ve added along the way, and for good reason. I added Green Earth recently, although I don’t use it a whole lot. The reason being is that it saves me a lot of time mixing a dark green. I like to use this as the shadows for palm trees and other vegetation. I also added Burnt Sienna, which is simply indispensable. Not only as a vibrant earth color but also because I use it to make BLACK. To get black all you have to do is mix Burnt Sienna with *Ultramarine blue.* This is commonly called ‘chromatic black,’ meaning that it is mixed from two colors and also because it is a lively mixture unlike Ivory or Mars Black, which are essentially lifeless and can deaden other colors when added. Black IS important and it DOES exist in nature…much to the chagrin of art educators the world over. Just make sure you mix a chromatic black. To make the black warmer, add a tad bit more Burnt Sienna. To make it cooler, or to make a cool gray, add in a larger amount of Ultramarine and mix it with equal parts white.

 

Ultramarine and Pthalo Blue

These are the two biggest hitters in my arsenal. I could not paint my bold and dramatic seascapes without them. Pthalo (leaning towards yellow on the color scale) and Ultramarine (leaning towards red) have been staples on my color palette for a long time. I use a LOT of Ultramarine paint. I use the Pthalo blue in smaller portions, for it is one of the strongest staining pigments on the market. A small dab of it will turn a puddle of Cadmium Yellow Light into a deep rich green. Manufactures even warn buyers of its relentless strength on their websites! ūüėČ

The white I use is Titanium, which is also fairly strong considering how opaque it is. It is a mainstay for me though, because I couldn’t work without it. I’ve gone through more tubes of Titanium than any other paint!

For those of you that haven’t seen my artwork, you can view it here¬†¬†http://www.ryankimbaart.com/

To follow me on fineartamerica, visit  http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html

I hope you enjoyed getting a VIP tour into my palette, and I hope you all have an AWESOME week–filled with creativity, fun, and personal growth. Stay tuned for my next post, which I am VERY EXCITED about! Next time I will be showing you how to paint a tropical seascape with palette knives! So be sure not to miss it. It should be super fun and informative.

Until then,

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*Ryan Kimba now on etsy*

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKSeascapePaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

 

 

Art is *NOT* about talent!

I’d like to talk about the widely held belief that artists are more talented then other people. If I had a dollar for every time someone told me that I have’ God-given talent,’ I wouldn’t need to start my own art business. I’ve heard countless times “I wish I could do what you do” and “you were born with tremendous talent, young man,” or “you have a rare gift for creating.” And while I appreciate the positive feedback and recognize that those people meant well…they are still¬†WRONG, to put it bluntly.

Talent and art ARE NOT intertwined. Everything I have learned in art I have had to develop. I have toiled for 10 years to get where I am today. People might say they want to learn to draw or paint, but the stark reality is that they will not put in the effort and work to learn how to do so. So they make excuses by thinking it is a divine gift reserved purely for the fortunate ones.

Anybody can learn how to paint! Given the time, work, and shift in perspective, any willing participant could learn to do what I do. Painting isn’t about learning how to draw and paint, it’s about learning how to “see.” Now that isn’t to say that making art is easy. It certainly isn’t! A lot of times art can be a very exhausting and emotionally draining affair, but it is something that I love and am called to do.

Don’t believe me when I say that anyone can develop the skills and tools to make fantastic art? Let us hop in a time machine…to 10 years ago. Beep, boop….beep….

 

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Here is my very first painting in watercolor of the open ocean. It was created 10 years ago when I was 18 years old.  As you can see it is very abstract and mediocre. Not to mention that fact that it is technically not a sound composition. This was a very humble beginning, I assure you. But I show you this now to prove to you that everybody has to start someone. Nobody is born an art prodigy, even though people think they are.

 

In the field of psychology, people who believe that knowledge, skill, and greatness are birth-rights are called “fixed-minded.” In other words, they have a fixed mindset. If they aren’t great at art right out of the gate, then it’s because they don’t have a knack for it. Sounds crazy, huh? Yet people in the “growth mindset” believe that all talent and ability must be worked at and refined. These are the artists who continuously strive to master their craft. People who will NEVER give up, like me. What if I had quit after glancing at that painting 10 years ago? Instead I decided to push through until I was able to create the painting you see below.

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So to all of you out there–you can achieve anything in life as long as you have a burning passion to learn and grow. The world is at your feet!!!

In my next post I will be revealing my color palette, and how each color works together in creating my beach paintings. It should be very fun and informative.

Until then, improve your techniques, and above all, have a blast painting!

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visit my shop at

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKSeascapePaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

 

To view my personal website, go to

http://www.ryankimbaart.com/

 

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html

 

 

Knives aren’t just for toast!

Every now and again I feel the need to take a hiatus from making art. A lot of times it stems from personal issues I am dealing with or a general lack of time. Of course these are merely excuses, because at the end of the day nothing should prevent you from doing what you love. What you are called to do.

During my time off I’ve learned some invaluable lessons in my art career, and I plan to use those lessons to strengthen my own voice and abilities. That said, I’ve decided to make some BOLD changes to my style. For several years all I cared about was making things as realistic and flawless as possible. I put in the time to make my oil paintings look like pictures. I felt I needed to do that at the time, but now I know that painting is about growth, discovery, and expression–not necessarily about making something look life-like. That is why man created a camera.

Here is an example of a prior painting in my super realistic style:

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Here we can see the soft, subtle blending in the sky and sand to hide the brush stokes and give the illusion of a photograph. The sharp contrast from the addition of black also adds to this effect. So what exactly was my bold change? I decided to become a palette-knife painter. That way I can remain loose and not have to worry about detailing everything to death. This drastic change has really opened a new world of possibilities for me.

Here is my first painting using the palette-knife technique:

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See the dramatic differences in this one? From the bold colors, textures, and sweeping knife strokes–this looks more like a painting. And it is certainly more impressionistic and expressive. It has more character to boot. Of course you can still see some detail, but more is left up to the viewer.

Painting with palette knifes took some getting used. The hardest part to get past was the strange similarity to buttering toast! And since you are painting “wet-on-wet,” you have a little less control than you would using brushes and waiting for layers to dry between applications. Another HUGE difference with using the knives is mixing your paint directly on the canvas instead of your palette. I couldn’t believe how much quicker it is!

I’m happy to be a palette knife painter! What changes have you made with your art lately?

Don’t forget to check out my etsy store and Fine Art America page:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/RKSeascapePaintings?ref=hdr_shop_menu

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ryan-kimba.html

So until next time,

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http://www.ryankimbaart.com